July 6, 2022
Uncategorized

11 Facts You Should Know About Nigeria as It Celebrates 60 Years of Independence – Global Citizen

  • November 15, 2021
  • 10 min read
11 Facts You Should Know About Nigeria as It Celebrates 60 Years of Independence – Global Citizen

Welcome back!
Sign in to start taking action.
Not a Global Citizen yet? Sign up
Forget your password?
Thanks for signing up as a global citizen. In order to create your account we need you to provide your email address. You can check out our Privacy Policy to see how we safeguard and use the information you provide us with. If your Facebook account does not have an attached e-mail address, you’ll need to add that before you can sign up.
This account has been deactivated.
Please contact us at contact@globalcitizen.org if you would like to re-activate your account.
On Oct. 1, Nigeria celebrates its Diamond Jubilee — marking 60 years since the country became an independent nation with the end of colonial rule. 
With an estimated population of about 204 million people, Nigeria today is the most populous Black nation on Earth and the seventh most populous country in the world
There is so much to learn about Nigeria, its people, and its cultures. With so much history and cultural richness, there are many lessons to be learned from Nigeria’s impact on the African continent and the world at large. Global Citizen celebrates the resilience and ingenuity of the Nigerian people on this historic and important day. 
Here are 11 historical facts you should know about the country often referred to as the “Giant of Africa”:
The land area known today as Nigeria was formed in 1914 when colonial authorities merged the Northern and Southern Protectorates of Nigeria, to form the amalgamated Protectorate and Colony of Nigeria. 
This merger brought together over 400 ethnic groups and tribes into what was then the largest British colony in the world. The name “Nigeria” is also derived from colonial sources. 

$(function() {
var contentListProps = {
contentList: JSON.parse(‘[{u0022idu0022:21607,u0022thumbnailsu0022:{u0022mediumu0022:{u0022landscapeu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/f1/0b/f10bd567u002Dc083u002D44aau002D8190u002Df186ff7d26f5/covidu002D19u002Dafricau002Dnigeriau002Dmedicalu002Dworkeru002D001.jpg__800x600_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022portraitu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/f1/0b/f10bd567u002Dc083u002D44aau002D8190u002Df186ff7d26f5/covidu002D19u002Dafricau002Dnigeriau002Dmedicalu002Dworkeru002D001.jpg__600x800_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/f1/0b/f10bd567u002Dc083u002D44aau002D8190u002Df186ff7d26f5/covidu002D19u002Dafricau002Dnigeriau002Dmedicalu002Dworkeru002D001.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022largeu0022:{u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/f1/0b/f10bd567u002Dc083u002D44aau002D8190u002Df186ff7d26f5/covidu002D19u002Dafricau002Dnigeriau002Dmedicalu002Dworkeru002D001.jpg__1600x900_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022creditsu0022:{u0022captionu0022:u0022A health worker hands out leaflets on how people should protect themselves from the new coronavirus, in Lagos, Nigeria, March 31, 2020 as the city faces a twou002Dweek lockdown with residents told to stay in their homes.u0022,u0022authoru0022:u0022Sunday Alamba/APu0022,u0022descriptionu0022:u0022A health worker hands out leaflets on how people should protect themselves from the new coronavirus, in Lagos, Nigeria, March 31, 2020 as the city faces a twou002Dweek lockdown with residents told to stay in their homes.u0022,u0022source_linku0022:null}},u0022titleu0022:u00225 Facts Every Nigerian Should Know About Our Health Careu0022,u0022urlu0022:u0022https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/healthu002Dcareu002Dfactsu002Dnigeriau002Dcovidu002D19/u0022}]’),
unorderedWithImage: true,
v3Styles: true,
v3Classes: “bst-container-fluid”,
showDescription: false,
showMobileImage: true,
thumbnailLinkTabIndex: “-1”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-content-list–501031”,
ContentList,
contentListProps
);
var pageHeadlineProps = {
h5: “Related Stories”,
className: “pt-0 pb-3 my-0”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-plugin-headline–501031”,
PageHeadlines,
pageHeadlineProps
);
});

Nigeria gained independence from the British empire in 1960, initially adopting a British style of government with Abubakar Tafawa Balewa as the first Nigerian head of government (prime minister). The country then had a population of over 45 million people
On Jan. 15 1966, a group of young, idealistic, UK-trained army majors overthrew Nigeria’s democratic government in a violent military coup — the country’s first. 
A succession of increasingly repressive military governments ruled Nigeria for 29 of the next 33 years, until the restoration of democracy in 1999
Some of the blowback effects of this coup include: 
In 1967, following two coups and turmoil that led to about a million Igbos (one of Nigeria’s most-populous ethnic groups primarily from the Eastern region of the country) returning to the south-east of Nigeria, the Republic of Biafra seceded
The Nigerian government declared war and after 30 months of fighting, Biafra surrendered. On Jan. 15 1970, the conflict officially ended.

$(function() {
var contentListProps = {
contentList: JSON.parse(‘[{u0022idu0022:21635,u0022thumbnailsu0022:{u0022mediumu0022:{u0022landscapeu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/2f/8c/2f8c264au002Db186u002D4846u002Da921u002De337a6a29ab5/accessu002Dtou002Deducationu002Dnigeriau002D001.jpg__800x600_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022portraitu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/2f/8c/2f8c264au002Db186u002D4846u002Da921u002De337a6a29ab5/accessu002Dtou002Deducationu002Dnigeriau002D001.jpg__600x800_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/2f/8c/2f8c264au002Db186u002D4846u002Da921u002De337a6a29ab5/accessu002Dtou002Deducationu002Dnigeriau002D001.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022largeu0022:{u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/2f/8c/2f8c264au002Db186u002D4846u002Da921u002De337a6a29ab5/accessu002Dtou002Deducationu002Dnigeriau002D001.jpg__1600x900_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022creditsu0022:{u0022captionu0022:u0022Mohammed, 12, sits in a classroom in Banki, northeast Nigeria on May 1, 2019.u0022,u0022authoru0022:u0022© Marko Kokic/UN0322365/UNICEFu0022,u0022descriptionu0022:u0022Mohammed, 12, sits in a classroom in Banki, northeast Nigeria on May 1, 2019. Although the town it still is considered one of the most dangerous places in Borno State, its local primary school has reopened. Refurbished with support from UNICEF, it has been designed with security and safety for children in mind – including a high perimeter wall, entry and exit gates.u0022,u0022source_linku0022:null}},u0022titleu0022:u00225 Issues Nigeria Must Address to Ensure Every Child Can Access a Quality Educationu0022,u0022urlu0022:u0022https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/issuesu002Dnigeriau002Dmustu002Daddressu002Dqualityu002Deducation/u0022}]’),
unorderedWithImage: true,
v3Styles: true,
v3Classes: “bst-container-fluid”,
showDescription: false,
showMobileImage: true,
thumbnailLinkTabIndex: “-1”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-content-list–501038”,
ContentList,
contentListProps
);
var pageHeadlineProps = {
h5: “Related Stories”,
className: “pt-0 pb-3 my-0”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-plugin-headline–501038”,
PageHeadlines,
pageHeadlineProps
);
});

Oil profitability in Nigeria was greatest during the 1970s, when it became the wealthiest country in Africa. 
Within two years, state profit increased by almost 50%, to an all-time high of N5.3 billion in 1976. 
Nigeria bolstered profits when it joined the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in 1971, and the discovery of oil is widely believed to have influenced the course of the civil war. 
Wole Soyinka was the first African to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, which he won in 1986, and he is also a prominent social critic and political activist. 
As an activist, he has been a voice for justice, freedom, and the end of tyranny. He has risked his life again and again to articulate the principles that provide the foundation for human rights, both in his native Nigeria and around the world.
Nigeria’s most successful Olympic outing was the 1996 Olympics, with the men’s football team winning Gold, and Chioma Ajunwa also winning a Gold medal in the women’s long jump event
In total that year, Nigeria won two Gold medals, one silver medal, and three bronze medals. 

$(function() {
var contentListProps = {
contentList: JSON.parse(‘[{u0022idu0022:21678,u0022thumbnailsu0022:{u0022mediumu0022:{u0022landscapeu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/47/94/479421cdu002D2406u002D4b5cu002Dbcc3u002D4f1e3d81ec2f/polio_vaccination_nigeria_cdc.jpg__800x600_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022portraitu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/47/94/479421cdu002D2406u002D4b5cu002Dbcc3u002D4f1e3d81ec2f/polio_vaccination_nigeria_cdc.jpg__600x800_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022,u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/47/94/479421cdu002D2406u002D4b5cu002Dbcc3u002D4f1e3d81ec2f/polio_vaccination_nigeria_cdc.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022largeu0022:{u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/47/94/479421cdu002D2406u002D4b5cu002Dbcc3u002D4f1e3d81ec2f/polio_vaccination_nigeria_cdc.jpg__1600x900_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.jpgu0022},u0022creditsu0022:{u0022captionu0022:null,u0022authoru0022:u0022Heather Scobie/CDCu0022,u0022descriptionu0022:u0022u0022,u0022source_linku0022:null}},u0022titleu0022:u0022How a 69u002DYearu002DOld Nigerian Polio Volunteer Singleu002DHandedly Transformed Her Communityu0022,u0022urlu0022:u0022https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/poliou002Dworkeru002Dtransformedu002Dheru002Dcommunityu002Dnigeria/u0022}]’),
unorderedWithImage: true,
v3Styles: true,
v3Classes: “bst-container-fluid”,
showDescription: false,
showMobileImage: true,
thumbnailLinkTabIndex: “-1”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-content-list–501055”,
ContentList,
contentListProps
);
var pageHeadlineProps = {
h5: “Related Stories”,
className: “pt-0 pb-3 my-0”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-plugin-headline–501055”,
PageHeadlines,
pageHeadlineProps
);
});

The 1999 transition of Nigeria from military to civilian, democratic government, was a defining moment in Nigerian history, representing the beginning of the longest, uninterrupted government since Independence in 1960. 
The presidential election took place in February 1999, and Olusegun Obasanjo, who as head of state in 1976–79 had overseen the last transition from military rule, was declared the winner.
Rivers State-born Agbani Darego was the first African woman to win the Miss World pageant — entering the history books with her victory in 2001.
Darego has worked with top brands such as Avon, Christian Dior, Sephora, Target, and Macy’s and appeared in world famous magazines such as Elle, Marie Claire, Allure, Trace, Stitch, Cosmopolitan, and Essence. She remains Nigeria’s most famous beauty queen. 

$(function() {
var contentListProps = {
contentList: JSON.parse(‘[{u0022idu0022:21226,u0022thumbnailsu0022:{u0022mediumu0022:{u0022landscapeu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/b8/34/b834cdaeu002D32deu002D4a75u002D9130u002Df0b37019a1d5/screen_shot_2020u002D06u002D27_at_183304.png__800x600_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.pngu0022,u0022portraitu0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/b8/34/b834cdaeu002D32deu002D4a75u002D9130u002Df0b37019a1d5/screen_shot_2020u002D06u002D27_at_183304.png__600x800_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.pngu0022,u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/b8/34/b834cdaeu002D32deu002D4a75u002D9130u002Df0b37019a1d5/screen_shot_2020u002D06u002D27_at_183304.png__800x450_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.pngu0022},u0022largeu0022:{u0022landscape_16_9u0022:u0022https://media.globalcitizen.org/thumbnails/b8/34/b834cdaeu002D32deu002D4a75u002D9130u002Df0b37019a1d5/screen_shot_2020u002D06u002D27_at_183304.png__1600x900_q85_crop_subsamplingu002D2.pngu0022},u0022creditsu0022:{u0022captionu0022:null,u0022authoru0022:null,u0022descriptionu0022:null,u0022source_linku0022:null}},u0022titleu0022:u0022Nigerian Choreographer Seyi Oluyole Is Using Dance to Help Children Stay in Schoolu0022,u0022urlu0022:u0022https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/dreamcatchersu002Dseyiu002Doluyoleu002Dglobalu002Dgoalu002Duniteu002Dcovid/u0022}]’),
unorderedWithImage: true,
v3Styles: true,
v3Classes: “bst-container-fluid”,
showDescription: false,
showMobileImage: true,
thumbnailLinkTabIndex: “-1”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-content-list–501056”,
ContentList,
contentListProps
);
var pageHeadlineProps = {
h5: “Related Stories”,
className: “pt-0 pb-3 my-0”
};
bindComponentToDiv(
“related-stories-plugin-headline–501056”,
PageHeadlines,
pageHeadlineProps
);
});

In April 2014 — looking back at the previous financial year — the statistics bureau of Nigeria confirmed the rebasing of the Nigerian economy’s gross domestic product (GDP) to $509.9 billion. 
This placed it well above South Africa’s nominal GDP of $322 billion and elevated Nigeria to the position of the largest economy in Africa.
Three Nigerian-American women — Seun Adigun, Ngozi Onwumere, and Akuoma Omeoga — made history and their Olympic dreams come true by being the first-ever African bobsled team to qualify for the Olympics. They were also the first Nigerian athletes to compete in a Winter Olympics event.
Nigeria is home to the greatest number of people living in extreme poverty in the world — meaning that efforts to tackle extreme poverty and its systemic causes in the country are vital to the Global Goals’ mission to end extreme poverty by 2030. You can join the movement to empower and protect vulnerable Nigerians by taking action here.
Editorial
Demand Equity
Oct. 1, 2020

source

About Author

redex

Red ExplorerNG is an online platform showcasing the richness of African culture. It provides online information that is not only limited to the following categories: Culture, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Business, Sports, Books, News, and Opinions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.